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Oxfam workers to face UK prosecution over sex crimes

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Prosecution awaits home for Oxfam workers involved in a prostitution scandal in Haiti.

Accoridng to Andrew MacLeod, the former chief of operations of the UN’s Emergency Coordination Centre, the workers could be prosecuted in the UK for sex crimes.


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Andrew MacLeod revealed that “predatory paedophiles” were now targeting charities in order to “access children” in the developing world.

Mr MacLeod, who now works for the charity Hear Their Cries, added that if aid workers had engaged in sexual activity with under-age children they could be prosecuted in England for breaking international sex tourism laws.

“The impact of sex tourism laws make it unlawful for anybody to have sex with children under the age of 16 anywhere in the world or aid, abet or support that,” Mr MacLeod told the Today programme.


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“If they were adults, this man should be charged in front of the courts in Haiti because prostitution is illegal.

“If they are children, they should be charged in front of the courts here because he’s broken the sex tourism laws. If they are uncertain, they should pass the dossier to the police for investigation.”

“Since 1999 the National Crime Authority, or its precursor, have been warning that predatory paedophiles, as we cracked down in the developed world, are now going to the developing world to get access to children.



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“Their chosen methodology is through charity. If we going to wipe out this problem that’s been known about for 30 years, people need to go to jail.”

Meanwhile, the Charity Commission on Monday revealed it has received as many as 1,000 reports a year related to safeguarding and sexual abuse in the charity sector, its director of investigations has revealed.

As new allegations continue to emerge over Oxfam’s handling of a prostitution “cover-up”, Michelle Russell claimed that the charity sector was “not immune” as she lifted the lid on the scale of the problem.


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